Athletes Foot Cure

Signs and symptoms


Athlete’s foot causes scaling, flaking, and itching of the affected skin. Blisters and cracked skin may also occur, leading to exposed raw tissue, pain, swelling, and inflammation. Secondary bacterial infection can accompany the fungal infection, sometimes requiring a course of oral antibiotics.

The infection can be spread to other areas of the body, such as the groin, and usually is called by a different name once it spreads, such as tinea corporis on the body or limbs and tinea cruris (jock itch or dhobi itch) for an infection of the groin. Tinea pedis most often manifests between the toes, with the space between the fourth and fifth digits most commonly afflicted.

Some individuals may experience an allergic response to the fungus called an “id reaction” in which blisters or vesicles can appear in areas such as the hands, chest and arms. Treatment of the fungus usually results in resolution of the id reaction.

Transmission

From person to person

Athlete’s foot is a communicable disease caused by a parasitic fungus in the genus Trichophyton, either Trichophyton rubrum or Trichophyton mentagrophytes. It is typically transmitted in moist environments where people walk barefoot, such as showers, bath houses, and locker rooms. It can also be transmitted by sharing footwear with an infected person, or less commonly, by sharing towels with an infected person.

To other parts of the body

The various parasitic fungi that cause athlete’s foot can also cause skin infections on other areas of the body, most often under toenails (onychomycosis) or on the groin (tinea cruris).

Prevention

The fungi that cause athlete’s foot can live on shower floors, wet towels, and footwear, and can spread from person to person from shared contact with showers, towels, etc.

Hygiene, therefore, plays an important role in managing an athlete’s foot infection. Since fungi thrive in moist environments, keeping feet and footwear as dry as possible, and avoiding sharing towels, etc., aids prevention of primary infection.


Treatments
There are many conventional medications (over-the-counter and prescription) as well as alternative treatments for fungal skin infections, including athlete’s foot. Important with any treatment plan is the practice of good hygiene. Several placebo controlled studies report that good foot hygiene alone can cure athlete’s foot even without medication in 30-40% of the cases. However, placebo-controlled trials of allylamines and azoles for athlete’s foot consistently produce much higher percentages of cure than placebo.

Since athlete’s foot thrives in moist environments it is important for individuals with hyperhidrosis to reduce excess sweating.

Alternative treatments

Topical oils

Tea tree oil. May improve the symptoms but does not cure the underlying fungal infection.

Garlic extract. Ajoene, a compound found in garlic, is sometimes used to treat athlete’s foot.

More Information:

Cure Athletes Foot In 7 Days.

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